Motama GmbH

2006-02-16

Newly founded spin-off company Motama enables networking for all multimedia devices

New software technology from German university is now available for commercial products

Access to TV shows recorded with your video recorder at home using your mobile phone, wireless distribution of music from an audio CD to all hi-fi systems in your household, or chatting with visitors at your entry phone using a webcam – all these networked applications are enabled by a software that has been developed at Saarland University, Germany. The software is called “Network-Integrated Multimedia Middleware (NMM)” and is now being brought to market by a company called Motama. The company was founded by two alumni from Saarland University, Marco Lohse and Michael Repplinger, together with their advisor Philipp Slusallek, a Professor for Computer Science. The NMM technology is the result of six years of research and can already be tested in its Open Source version. Numerous manufacturers of mobile phones and consumer electronics, but also major telecommunication companies have shown great interest in the developed technology.

An increasing number of multimedia devices, such as TV sets, hi-fi systems, or digital video recorders, but also mobile phones or control devices for home networks, already offer advanced networking interfaces. Due to the numerous available but incompatible technologies, today’s applications are mostly restricted to mere data exchange or only support specific devices or networks. “Until now, there was no easy way to access the devices available in the network in order to employ their specific capabilities”, explains Marco Lohse. For the first time, the “Network-Integrated Multimedia Middleware (NMM)” offers a technology that enables the seamless and safe networking of available devices – within the home network and beyond.

The software architecture NMM allows for transparently connecting all devices available within the network and also extends control to the network. This results in completely new “virtual” devices: A mobile phone can control a CD player in the living-room and music can be distributed wirelessly to several hi-fi systems within a single household. “A smooth and synchronous playback of audio and video content is automatically performed when using our software”, Marco Lohse points out one of the many features of NMM. The NMM software operates across different platforms: Arbitrary networks and devices are supported, for example Windows PCs, but also mobile phones, or embedded devices running the Linux operating system, such as set-top boxes.

Because of the flexible licensing policy of NMM, the developed software can be used in commercial products as well as in Open Source and research projects. In addition, Motama supplies services for helping customers to develop all kinds of networked multimedia systems.

More information is available online http://www.motama.com/

[press release]